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How Much Can You Save With Solar Panels? Just Ask Google

August 18 -- If you're considering solar power but aren’t quite sure it’s worth
the expense, Google wants to point you in the right direction. Tapping its trove
of satellite imagery and the latest in artificial intelligence, the company is
offering a new online service that will instantly estimate how much you’ll save
with a roof full of solar panels. >>View Article

Low Prices, Technology Could Mean New Gust of NW Wind Power

August 18 -- Wind energy prices have hit an all-time low and the cost of
installing turbines has fallen 20 to 40 percent in the last five years,
according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Its new report says last year's
wind-power price contracts with utilities averaged under 2.5 cents per
kilowatt-hour, down from 7 cents in 2009. >>View Article

Poet Report Details Company's Economic Impact

August 18 -- Sioux Falls-based Poet generated $13.5 billion in sales for U.S.
businesses last year, according to a new economic impact study that looked at
the company’s contributions to national economic and job growth.

It found the ethanol producer added $5.4 billion in national gross domestic
product last year and supported nearly 40,000 jobs. That contributed $3.1
billion in income to U.S. families. >>View Article

Price of Wind Energy at an All-Time Low

August 13 -- The price of oil isn't the only energy source that's going down. A
new Department of Energy report, prepared by the Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory, has found that wind energy prices have hit an all-time low.

While oil is rarely used any longer to generate electricity, energy prices in
general tend to move together. The Berkeley Lab report found that the prices
offered by wind projects to utility purchasers averaged under 2.5¢ per kilowatt
hour (kWh) for projects negotiating contracts in 2014, which increased demand
for wind energy. >>View Article

Military’s Shift Toward Renewable Energy

August 13 -- To achieve military operational success, the Department of Defense
(DoD) relies on one mission-essential resource: energy. The DoD is the largest
government consumer of energy in the United States, with petroleum-based liquid
fuels composing approximately two-thirds of the DoD’s consumption.

The DoD has requisitioned the deployment of 3 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy
to power military facilities by 2025. This meets a larger DoD mandate, Title 10
USC § 2911, which directs at least 25 percent of any DoD facility energy
consumption come from renewable energy sources. Implementing alternatives has
evolved from increasing energy distribution costs, foreign oil dependency, the
threat of energy supply disruptions and the need for more secure and clean
energy generation and distribution. >>View Article

Robbins: Renewable Energy is Attainable

August 13 -- Every now and then, something extraordinary comes out of the S.C.

More than a year ago, Act 236, the Distributed Energy Resource Program Act, was
signed by the governor, enabling the conservation community and statewide
utilities to negotiate unprecedented benefits to level the playing field for the
installation of residential rooftop solar in South Carolina. >>View Article

Utah is Primed for a Solar Boom

August 12 -- The state of Utah is on the precipice of a solar revolution, but its trajectory could be disrupted by the looming expiration of the federal investment tax credit (ITC) for solar energy.

Utah is just beginning to tap into its solar energy potential, ranking No. 5 in installed solar capacity out of all the Mountain states of the West. It now has enough solar energy installed to power 5,500 homes, however, more solar development is in the works that will bring Utah closer to its neighboring states, like Arizona, Nevada, Colorado and New Mexico, which are already booming with solar activity. >>View Article

PUC Holds the Fate of 6,000 Solar Energy Jobs

August 12 -- Following my honorable discharge from the U.S. Navy, I moved from Hampton Roads, Va., back to Las Vegas to be closer to my parents.

Once back, I finished my degree in information technology and eventually joined the SolarCity family, where I found my career in the solar industry. It’s inspiring to see so many Nevadans choose solar for their homes and families, but I fear now that it could all be at risk. >>View Article

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