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By David Field, OneRoof Energy CEO and Founder

The demand for solar in the U.S. has nearly doubled over the past few years, bringing significant opportunity for solar installation providers along with challenges that such rapid growth inevitably brings. Now the solar industry must collectively take advantage of this momentum by advocating for a streamlined and more efficient solar permitting practices and working with local governments to establish a permitting standard that will increase efficiencies and help installers manage costs amid this growth.

By ACORE's Transportation Associate Pete Metz

ACORE’s Transportation Initiative launched in early 2012 to position our organization at the intersection of the renewable energy industry and the transportation sector.  ACORE recognized this as an important opportunity for a number of reasons:

Evolving Media Coverage Of Renewable Energy

Published on 22 Oct 2012  |   Written by 

By Peter Gardett

The renewable energy industry has gone from a media darling to often being blamed for a wide range of problems and economic issues. Those problems often in truth have little or nothing to do with the underlying business propositions of the projects that make up the sector, and we at AOL Energy hear feedback and complaints from the industry all the time.

Support for renewable energy by the Obama administration has made the sector a political football, with the Romney campaign attacking green energy projects without much nuance. Many forms of renewable energy are in fact actively supported by Republicans who might shy away from the “green energy” label, and that reflects an evolving complexity that has proved difficult for much of the media to cover. 

Continued Coverage of RETECH2012

Published on 19 Oct 2012  |   Written by 

By George Dearing

If there were any doubts about the global potential for renewable energy, Michael Lewis, COO at E.ON Renewables, quickly put them to rest. Opening up Thursday's keynote at this years RETECH conference in Washington, D.C., Lewis told the audience renewables will continue to expand, with global capacity expected to increase three-fold by 2020. "When people ask me if renewables are just a niche, I show them the data we've put together," he said.

Lewis expects the industry to grow between seven to fourteen percent leading up to 2020. And he thinks investment dollars will follow, citing the seventeen percent year-over-year growth for renewables in 2011. He explained that in spite of the natural gas surplus in the United States, renewables like solar bring predictability to pricing, which reduces volatility in wholesale and retail utility markets.

Welcome to the ACORE Guest Blog!

Published on 09 Oct 2012  |   Written by 

October, 9 2012

I joined the ACORE team about five months ago after I finished my undergraduate work at Rutgers University.  The first thing I noticed when I joined ACORE is how dedicated the staff is to promoting renewable energy.  In so many ways ACORE is at the center of the renewable energy industry.  This is reflected in the architecture of ACORE events that facilitate business collaboration and networking among all sectors of the industry and provide unique opportunities to learn about the state of the industry from a wide and inclusive perspective.  I've heard tremendous conversations at these events regarding clean technology, investment, policy, and numerous other issues and hope conversations of that caliber reach a larger audience through this Guest Blog.

Submitted By ACORE Member, The Heat is Power Association

HIP

There is a largely unheralded fuel that is continuously produced at nearly every energy intensive industrial process in the US and worldwide. The fuel is readily available and produced whenever the plant is operating. When converted to electricity, it produces no incremental emissions, just like traditional renewables.  Any power not used onsite can be sold to the grid. 

What is this mystery fuel?  Waste Heat.  Recoverable waste heat is produced around the clock in substantial quantities each day.  If harnessed to produce power in the US, waste heat could generate as much as 10 GW of emission-free electricity, enough to power 10 million American homes, provide $3 billion in savings for US industry, and spur the creation of 160,000 new American jobs. 

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