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April 25 -- North Carolina lawmakers today rejected efforts to scale back the use of renewable energy. The House Public Utilities Committee voted 18 to 13 against the Affordable & Reliable Energy Act, said Ivan Urlaub, executive director of NC Sustainable Energy Association, which has been fighting the effort to reduce policies that require utilities to use power generated from clean sources. >>View Article

Monday, 22 April 2013 14:46

Renewable Energy An Economic Boon For NC

April 22 -- A 2007 compromise among utilities, legislators, regulators and community groups brought substantial investments in domestic renewable energy. The 2007 standard is working and fueling job growth and economic investment that is good for the economy, good for business and good for consumers. >>View Article

Thursday, 11 April 2013 18:19

RPS Attacks Go Against The March Of History

April 11 -- Last month in Phoenix, I watched the very conservative governor of Arizona, Jan Brewer, deliver a brief keynote speech to open the second day of the CleanTech Future conference put on by CleanTech Connections and the Arizona Commerce Authority. Nineteen floors above the impressive solar PV arrays at Arizona State University's downtown campus across the street, Brewer extolled the virtues of solar and other clean energy as a business boon for her state. >>View Article

April 10 -- Repealing its renewable energy law could impact North Carolina's new and expanding clean energy job base, says professional logger association executive director.  >>View Article 

April 9 -- In a recent column the New England Ratepayers Association’s Marc Brown incorrectly claims that ratepayers are being forced to buy expensive electricity under the state’s renewable portfolio standard when cheaper alternatives exist, and at no value to us (“Green energy hits ratepayers’ pockets hard,” Monitor Forum, March 28). Brown’s claim was refuted when New Hampshire undertook serious economic evaluations and bipartisan collaboration before concluding that employing a renewable portfolio standard is indeed in the best interests of ratepayers and the public good. >>View Article

April 9 -- Clean energy is helping North Carolina’s economy and creating jobs in and around Charlotte. One of the drivers of this economic growth has been the state’s Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard, or REPS, which in 2007 passed with a nearly unanimous, bipartisan vote. >>View Article

April 4 -- RPS policies have also supported incredibly strong job creation across the country in places like North Carolina, where 21,000 people are employed by the clean energy industry, and Kansas, where about 28,000 Americans work in clean energy. Together, America’s clean energy economy employs 3.4 million people and is growing four times faster than any other type of work according to new data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And industries such as solar saw employment increase 13.2 percent in 2012 in large part due to RPS policies. >>View Article

March 26 -- Nowadays, a huge chunk of the action on clean energy in the United States is happening at the state level. Some 29 states and Washington D.C. have renewable energy standards requiring electric utilities to get a portion of their power from sources like wind or solar. >>View Article

Monday, 25 March 2013 14:54

Preserve Renewable Energy Standards

March 25 -- In 2005, the Montana Legislature set a modest, sensible energy standard that 15 percent of the power acquired by utilities would come from renewable energy – primarily wind – by 2015. Now some legislators are working to undermine that standard by redefining it. Changes proposed under Senate Bills 31 and 45 would effectively eliminate wind and solar power in future energy supplies. When lawmakers set the renewable energy standard, Montana had a mere 2 megawatts of generating capacity from wind turbines. Now we have 627 megawatts of capacity. View Article >>

March 21 -- Experts at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) are urging Ohio state senators to remember the many benefits of the state’s clean energy standards, warning that reliance on biased information from outside groups aimed at ending the standards could harm their state in the long run. >>View Article

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