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ACORE Blog

For Green Bonds, Corporates Hold the Key to Growth

Published on 17 Aug 2016  |   Written by  Patrick Eble

The American Council on Renewable Energy's (ACORE) latest intern publication, titled Green Bond Market Insights—Why Corporates Matter analyzes exciting new developments in the green bond market and explains the increasing role that corporate issuers can play in its expansion. Written by summer 2016 intern, Patrick Eble, this publication comes at a time when total global debt issuance topped $4 trillion in 2015, of which only $42.4 billion (or 1.1%) were green bonds. Even more staggering are the figures for corporate green bond issuance in the United States, in which companies have issued $8 billion dollars of green bonds since 2013, a mere 0.15% of the country’s total corporate debt issuance over the same period. So how will the green bond market grow? Corporate issuance is crucial.

While China has been grabbing the attention of the Asia-Pacific market and Mexico and Peru have been making headlines in Latin America with record low auction prices, developers looking to further expand in those markets should look to two countries: India and Argentina. The Indian government released big news for renewable energy developers in July as the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) announced its plan to double the large-scale solar target from 20 to 40 GW by 2020. Argentina is also prepared for increased growth in renewable energy capacity as the country plans its first renewable energy auction under President Mauricio Macri’s "RenovAR" program in mid-August. Savvy project developers and investors who can navigate the political landscape of these countries will find new and unprecedented opportunities for growth and return on investment.

Community Solar Power: A Look at the Business Models Behind Shared Solar

Published on 06 Jun 2016  |   Written by  Kenneth Kramer

With most residential rooftop area in the U.S. unsuitable for traditional PV panels, the community solar model provides many customers a cost effective alternative for “going solar.” Community solar brings policy benefits like net metering, similar to rooftop installations, and models have developed, and continue to evolve, that allow customers to access community solar through their incumbent utility, as owners in a cooperative group, or as a nonprofit.

On March 17, the American Council On Renewable Energy (ACORE) hosted its annual Renewable Energy Policy Forum, where speakers and attendees came to a broad consensus that consistent policy is the missing link in the national renewable energy playing field. Industry leaders noted that many had looked to the Clean Power Plan (CPP) as a source for political guidance. However, now that the climate rule has been put on hold, uncertainty remains. Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) affirmed that the recent tax extenders for wind and solar will allow for the renewable industry to strategically prepare for upcoming years. But in order to achieve a more stable tableau for all renewables, Congress must agree on comprehensive tax reform – the Senator called the current tax code “a rotting dead carcass” and a “monument to yesteryear.” Business leaders also agreed that even negative consistent policy is preferable to inconsistency – and long-term consistent policy is not yet part of the American play book. 

Driving Growth in a New Policy Landscape

Published on 18 Apr 2016  |   Written by 

This year’s annual National Renewable Energy Policy Forum, hosted by ACORE, took place on the heels of an important policy update for key technologies. In December 2015, Congress approved a combined tax and budget package giving wind and solar what amounts to between five and seven years of policy “certainty” for investors and developers. But tax policy is only one part of the equation. We got another important boost that same month from the successful international climate meetings in Paris where 129 nations came together and, in essence, agreed to move to a low-carbon economy. But just a few weeks later, the Supreme Court issued a surprising stay of EPA’s carbon-cutting regulatory initiative, the Clean Power Plan, which threw sand in the gears of an implementation effort that was just gaining momentum. The stay is likely to delay implementation efforts by more than a year, even as states respond in dramatically different ways. In the meantime, it will be up to the renewable sector and its allies to maintain the public and private sector momentum behind the shift to renewable generation.

Below is our quick overview of the key discussions and leading news stories emerging from this year’s Policy Forum. Three major stories reported on from this year’s Policy Forum:

In the Fortune 500, Clean Energy is Good for Business

Published on 30 Mar 2016  |   Written by 

Fortune 500 companies are at an all-time high in terms of value – some $17+ trillion dollars as of this time last year. The explosive growth of tech businesses in particular, Google, Amazon, Apple and many more, has set the standard for modern capitalism in terms of profits and advancement up the Fortune list. But one key to success for these companies has flown relatively under the radar: the sustainability-driven push towards using renewable energy.

This past March, the American Council On Renewable Energy (ACORE) used day one of its annual National Renewable Energy Policy Forum to highlight the work being done by corporate leaders to power their operations increasingly using clean, renewable energy. With over 150 companies having signed the White House’s American Business Act on Climate Pledge – covering $4.2 trillion in annual revenue and a combined market capitalization of over $7 trillion – Corporate America's commitment to clean energy is undeniable and growing rapidly. ACORE’s Corporate Procurement Working Group Executive Meeting: “Advancing Corporate Energy Solutions,” hosted many of these businesses, and highlighted several critical challenges and opportunities ahead of the sector as this trend continues.

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